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Oldest Living Species On The Planet Found Swimming In a Puddle

Hello to all! Today we'd like to introduce you to a very little known animal species. Triops cancriformis, or tadpole shrimp, is a species of tadpole shrimp found in Europe to the Middle East and India. Due to habitat destruction, many populations have recently been lost across its European range, so, the species is considered endangered in the United Kingdom and in several European countries. Tadpole shrimps can be up to 10cm long when fully grown and have a broad oval  shell at their front end and a long slender abdomen, giving them a tadpole-like shape.

This species is considered to be one of the oldest living species on the planet at around 200 million years old. Hold up…how old?! That's right, you read that correctly. This now endangered species has been around for 200 millionnnn years. They live in temporary stands of water and their eggs can survive for a long time in dry sediment. In fact you may have encountered Triops 'kits' in shops - packets of eggs and food from which you can hatch your own small Triops as pets. These are often marketed as 'from the age of the dinosaurs' or 'prehistoric sea monsters.'  Pretty flippin cool.

 

15 images and videos of tadpole shrimps | thumbnail left three tadpole shrimps in water, thumbnail right cartoon tadpole shrimp
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From Caterpillar To Cocoon To Beautiful Butterfly

How does a caterpillar become a butterfly? Scientific American explains that: 'As children, many of us learn about the wondrous process by which a caterpillar morphs into a butterfly. The story usually begins with a very hungry caterpillar hatching from an egg. The caterpillar, or what is more scientifically termed a larva, stuffs itself with leaves, growing plumper and longer through a series of molts in which it sheds its skin. One day, the caterpillar stops eating, hangs upside down from a twig or leaf and spins itself a silky cocoon or molts into a shiny chrysalis. Within its protective casing, the caterpillar radically transforms its body, eventually emerging as a butterfly or moth.'

Pretty amazing right? Science is so cool! We find it absolutely mind boggling that butterflies were once caterpillars, the only difference is that caterpillars have not been through the scientific process that makes them butterflies. It's all a matter of time, and science! Learn more here. 
 

images and videos of butterfly hatching from cocoon | thumbnail left picture of freshly hatched butterfly, thumbnail right picture of cocoon
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Three Second Goldfish Memory Theory: Debunked

Goldfish are known for their poor memories. However, this is a complete myth that! Despite its lack of scientific backing, this concept has spread widely and remained largely undisputed for many years. What if I told you that goldfish memory can actually last weeks, months, and even years! You'd be all like: bish whaaaaat. Well, it's true! These uniquely beautiful little fishies are easily recognizable by their distinct orange hues covering their little bodies and spreading as well to their extensive fins.

Live Science recently reached out to Culum Brown, an expert in fish cognition at Macquarie University in Australia, who told Live Science: 'We've known about the reasonably good memories of goldfish since the '50s and '60s. Despite what everybody thinks, they're actually really intelligent.' 'Brown has studied the intelligence of fish, including goldfish, for more than 25 years and thinks the misconception comes from a combination of ignorance about fish intelligence in general and guilt, because pet owners often keep them in small, boring tanks.'

Check out more interesting scientific content here!

 

News story list goldfish memory 13 pictures | thumbnail left picture of two goldfish swimming together, thumbnail right bright orange goldfish swimming away showing beautiful orange fins
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An experiment led by Dr. Akiko Takaoka from the Department of Psychology at Japan's Kyoto University concluded that dogs can recognize bad people. Watch the main scientific results in this video by Brightside.  

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