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When A Cat's Food Bowl Is Empty, They Move Onto The Next Best Thing (Comic)

Mmm... food. We, humans, love food but do you know who loves food even more? Your pet(s). If your pet is anything like ours, you probably don't get a moment of peace from the moment you open the fridge to the moment you finish your last bite. And of course, if you leave your plate unattended (even if it's empty), your pet will be there faster than you can blink! They are truly sneaky animals

Let's be real though, we obviously can't feed our pets 24/7, they would never stop eating and their health would be in jeopardy. They don't know it but we don't feed them 24/7 because we love them and care about their health. Sometimes, we wish we could tell them that so they don't think we're absolute villains. 

We're pretty sure pets think about food 98% of their day, and the other remaining amount they're just dreaming of food.  In collaboration with Israeli artist, Ilana Zeffren, we get a glimpse of what that moment is truly like. 

if you want more cat enjoyment, be sure to check out last week's installment: Illustrator Creates Fun Cat Costume Guessing Game!

cat with empty food bowl dreams about eating - thumbnail of cat looking at empty food bowl and saying "im hungry"
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Via PawMeow
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Let the relaxing music lull you into ease and let the insanely adorable kitten melt your heart until it becomes nothing more than a gooey messy on the floor. 

This video is by PawMeow, an oridinary couple with a big dream to provide for stray cats in Bulgaria.

Thank you PawMeow, for your caring hearts. 

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And it's absolutely mesmerizing! 

"Do octopuses dream?" According to Nature on PBS, the brilliant change of color might be an indicator that the sleeping octopus is in fact dreaming. 

"If she is dreaming, this is a dramatic moment," said Dr Scheel, a marine biologist narrating the clip from an upcoming PBS nature documentary. 

"She sees a crab and her color starts to change a little bit, then she turns all dark, octopuses will do that when they leave the bottom (of the ocean)."

"This is a camouflage," Dr. Scheel continues, "like she's just subdued a crab and now she's going to sit there and eat it and she doesn't want anyone to notice her."

"To see the color come and go on her mantle like that, just to be able to see all the different color patterns flashing one after the other, you don't normally see that when an animal's sleeping."

It truly is a spectacular sight.

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