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Photos Show That People Were Riding Zebras In The Late 19th And Early 20th Centuries

A new photo archive by Vintag.es shows that some of the European colonizers penetrating Africa in the 19th and early 20th centuries were riding wild zebras as an alternative to horses. 

The reason behind it is the zebra's resistance to diseases carried by tsetse flies which made their domestication more attractive.  

However, as many European colonizers learned in the early 20th century, despite their similarity to horses, zebras are just a bit too wild to completely tame. 

Unlike horses, which naturally roam around munching on grass, zebras spend their lives cagily watching, evading and fighting savannah predators such as lions, cheetahs and crocodiles. Natural selection has bred zebras to be nervous, flighty and brutally aggressive if cornered. 

But taming individual zebras to perform horse-like duties has occasionally been successful. Lord Walter Rothschild, for instance, trained a team of zebras to pull a carriage, which he drove past Buckingham Palace to demonstrate their supposedly pliable nature.


Photos Show That People Were Riding Zebras From The Late 19th And Early 20th Centuries | black and white vintage photo of a carriage pulled by zebras
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Foxes In Cities Evolving Smaller Skulls, Much Like Domesticated Pets

This is pretty wild! Or... quite literally the opposite of wild. 

According to a new study, foxes that were found in the city of London have stubbier snouts, and even smaller skulls than their wildlife-dwelling counterparts. And these changes aren't that new, it's been seen before.. with cats and dogs as they became domesticated 20,000 and 40,000 years ago.

Researchers are now suggesting that city foxes could possibly be self-domesticating due to the demands of the city environment, as well as, exposure to humans. 

So why are these adaptations happening? Foxes that dwell in the city are reported to have a wider snout and smaller braincase due to the levels of requiring food in the city versus their natural habitat. They rely on food scraps, which doesn't require as strong of a bite to clamp down on bones. Whereas country foxes need that snout that enables them to bite their prey quickly. 

Story via Business Insider

foxes wild city domestication domesticated animals city urban red fox study skulls | family of foxes mama fox and her three cubs babies standing together on a hill
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